Current Beach Conditions

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Planning a visit? What you need to know.

A red tide bloom in the Gulf of Mexico is affecting some beach conditions throughout our destination. Because we're blessed with 35 miles of white sandy shores, the effects can vary depending on which beach community you're enjoying and it can change for the better quickly, too. Red tide is a naturally occurring phenomenon and has been documented along Florida's Gulf Coast since the 1840s. It typically forms offshore and affects our coast from on-shore winds. 

Current beach conditions | (listed from north to south)

We normally update this page twice a day, around 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Remember, conditions vary by beach and by time of day, and can affect people differently. For a new experimental respiratory effects forecasting tool, click here.

Beaches Map

Fred Howard Park (updated 8:30 a.m. 10-20)

    • Normal conditions 

Honeymoon Island State Park (updated 4 p.m. 10-19)

    • Normal conditions

Caladesi Island State Park (updated 7:53 a.m. 10-19)

    • Normal conditions

Clearwater Beach, Pier 60 (updated 9:48 a.m. 10-20)

    • Normal conditions

Sand Key Park, (updated 8 a.m. 10-20)

    • Normal conditions

Belleair Beach, 360 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:15 a.m. 10-20)

    • Normal conditions 

Belleair Shores, 1540 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:15 a.m. 10-20)

    • Normal conditions 

Indian Shores, 19418 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:50 a.m. 10-20)

    • Dark water 
    • Mild odor 
    • Mild respiration irritation

Indian Rocks Beach, 1402 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:25 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water water
    • No odor 
    • No respiration irritation

North Redington Beach, (updated 8:30 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • No odor 
    • No respiration irritation

Redington Beach, La Contessa Pier (updated 8:22 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • No odor 
    • No respiration irritation

Redington Shores, 18200 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:30 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • Mild odor 
    • No respiration irritation

Madeira Beach, 15208 Gulf Blvd. (updated 8:08 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • No odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Treasure Island, South of John's Pass Bridge (updated 8 a.m. 10-20)

    • Clear water 
    • Slight odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Sunset Beach (updated 8:30 a.m. 10-20)

    • Clear water 
    • Slight odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

St. Pete Beach, 70th Ave. (updated 9 a.m. 10-20)

    • Clear water
    • Slight odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Pass-A-Grille, 1st Ave. (updated 9 a.m. 10-20)

    • Clear water
    • Slight odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Fort De Soto Park Bay side (updated 8:00 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • Mild odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Fort De Soto Park Gulf side (updated 7:55 a.m. 10-20)

    • Slightly discolored water 
    • No odor 
    • No respiration irritation 

Current Beach Cams

Check out our live beach cams to see current conditions yourself.

What is red tide?

Red tide is a common name for a naturally occurring worldwide phenomenon known as an algal bloom. It has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840's and typically forms offshore and affects our coast from on-shore winds. When it blooms, it can cause human respiratory problems and kill marine life. Higher concentrations of red tide can also affect humans, causing both skin irritation and irritation to the respiratory system.

Currently, red tides can’t be predicted, but researchers are investigating the possibility. The effects of a red tide (e.g., dead fish and respiratory irritation in people) depend on the location and concentration of the red tide microorganism at a given time. The effects also depend on wind speed and direction. It is important to realize that many people still enjoy the beaches during red tides. Respiratory irritation and dead fish are not always present. Swimming is safe for most people. However, red tide can cause some people to suffer from skin irritation and burning eyes. Use common sense. If you are particularly susceptible to irritation from plant products, avoid red tide water. If you experience irritation, get out of the water and thoroughly wash. 

Have further questions? Here are some additional resources. 

Daily water testing samples from around Pinellas County

Current beach conditions from MOTE Marine Laboratory

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Current Status

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Information

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